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Accordance with Nature: Thoughtful Wood and Metal Goods by a Self-Taught Maker

Made in Connecticut: Accordance with Nature (AWN), beautifully designed, multi-functional storage implements, evocative of Shaker brooms and boxes, by Patrick Turiello, a self-daught woodworker and metalworker with a background in sculpture and sound design and a degree in architecture. We originally spotted AWN when Turiello exhibited at Field & Supply a couple of years ago; now, we’re taking a closer look at a few favorite pieces. N.B.: Turiello also offers custom work, as well as a “set” of many pieces “in the same specials of wood/metal;” inquire for more. Photography via Accordance with Nature. Above: Turiello’s Clamp and Vessel, shown here in…

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Animal, Vegetable, or Mineral? (Part I)

There is black mold that looks a lot like particulate and both or either can show up on fiberglass insulation associated with air leakage. See the image below. Moisture problems in the cathedral ceiling of this home led to some invasive inspection. Note how the black discoloration follows the vent chute pattern. But is the discoloration from black mold or dirt/particulate? Photo: Building-Wright client, used with permission There is efflorescence that looks a lot like white mold, and both or either can show up on basement concrete walls or wood posts bearing directly on concrete. See the image below. Wood…

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From Field to Furniture: The Three Oaks Collection from Edward Collinson

We discovered craftsman Edward Collinson a couple of years ago (see A Simple Bespoke Cabin in North Yorkshire) and quickly became admirers of his work. His latest: a new collection of furniture called The Three Oaks, “created from trees from my around my home in North Yorkshire. The collection represents the studio’s belief in mindful, responsible production and our love for this historic English resource,” Collinson says. The Three Oaks collection is currently on view at  The New Craftsmen’s Mayfair showroom until September, and is also available to order online. Here’s a look: Photography by Henry Weir courtesy of Edward Collinson. Above: The English…

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Bill to Cut New York City Carbon Emissions: $20 Billion

Legislation to lower greenhouse gas emissions from New York City's largest buildings could cost their owners as much as $24 billion over the next decade, according to a new analysis. Photo: Daniel Mennerick / CC BY-NC-ND / Flickr New York City’s plan to slash carbon emissions from large buildings over the next decade won’t be cheap. John Mandyck, board chairman of the Urban Green Council, said in a post on the nonprofit’s website that retrofitting nearly 50,000 buildings will cost building owners between $16.6 billion and $24.3 billion. But the effort also will bring new opportunities and thousands of new…

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Wood Floors Are Lightening Up

When it comes to updating the look of wood floors, homeowners are embracing ash blondes, driftwood grays, and transparent, whitewashed tones. These popular pale hues have a practical side, too: They’re better than dark wood finishes at hiding dirt and crumbs. If you aren’t in the market for new flooring, you can get the look by refinishing—and any species of solid-wood flooring is a candidate. Sanding off the old finish is the starting point; then you’ve got two choices. The easy route—and one you could do yourself—is to apply a pigmented penetrating oil like Rubio Monocoat. This kind of oil…

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Time to Upgrade Your Toilet?

Any pre-Y2K toilet that’s not clearing in one flush is a likely candidate for retirement, says Pete DeMarco of the Alliance for Water Efficiency. Those early low-flows from the ’90s employed narrow trapways (the passage from bowl to drain) in order to empty the bowl and still meet the national 1.6-gallons-per-flush (gpf) mandate instituted in 1994.While the toilets used less water, the trapways were choke points, sparking consumer complaints. It wasn’t until about 2003, DeMarco says, that most makers had fully reengineered their fixtures—and widened the trapways—to achieve both efficient and effective flushing. The march to maximize water savings hasn’t…

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